Knee Pain? It Might Be OSD

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Young adolescent boys and girls who are involved in active sports like swimming, football, cricket, tennis, volleyball, ballet, skating etc. often complain of pain in knee. This stressful condition which occurs due to overuse of knee bones, muscles and tendons is known as Osgood-Schlatter Disease (OSD).

Though it is called a disease, it is not actually a disease but is more of an overuse injury in the growing children. Once known to be more common among adolescent boys, there is hardly any gender difference now because girls are also participating in sports equally.

OSD usually strikes active adolescents at the beginning of their growth spurt – between the ages of 8 to 14 in girls and 10-15 in boys. It stays for 1-2 years and then gradually subsides on its own once the child’s bones stop growing. When the children’s bones, muscles and tendons are still growing, there is a difference in the strength and size of various parts. This puts unbalanced stress on the growth plates when they exercise or play active sports.

Symptoms of OSD may include:

  1. Pain that may be intermittent or constant, mild or severe
  2. Inflammation
  3. Swelling or tenderness under the knee
  4. Limping or inability to work properly
  5. Inability to sleep due to pain
  6. Tightness of the muscles surrounding the knee
  7. Calcification of the tendon

Osgood-Schlatter Disease goes away over a period of time. Treatment of OSD is largely about managing the symptoms like relieving pain. This is done through medication, rest, ice packs compression and activity modification. Rest is the key to relieve pain from OSD.

Children should limit the activities that cause pain. Also, warm-up and stretching before and after an activity is important. There are hardly any long-term complications associated with OSD except some kids may get a permanent but painless bump below the knee. OSD can be painful and frustrating for kids but usually resolves itself within 12 to 24 months.

If the knee pain is interfering with your child’s ability to perform routine tasks, seek doctor’s help. Visit our website today and get expert advice! http://www.credihealth.com/

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